The Print-on-Demand Cover vs the Ebook Cover

Publishing Print-on-Demand and Ebook Simultaneously

Lessons Learned for Book Cover Design

Cool in Tucson First Edition

The cover of the original Severn House edition (2008).

Mystery writer Elizabeth Gunn’s Cool in Tucson has been out of print for a few years, and we are in the galley proof stage of reissuing this first Sarah Burke mystery in both print and ebook formats.

We’ve been working with ebooks for several years now, but this marks the second time we’ve utilized print-on-demand services concurrently with producing an ebook. (The first was the similar relaunch of Elizabeth’s Jake Hines series with Triple Play.) Below are some lessons learned from the process regarding the print-on-demand cover and its relationship to the ebook cover. Continue Reading →

Android app development cross pollination

SnapToMe Plus iconToday I had the pleasure of pushing the new generation of our SnapTo apps to the Google Play Store. Our three apps, SnapToMe, SnapToMe Plus, and MyDumbBoard are all variations on a theme: give the new or very busy phone user the simplest possible way to snap a picture straight to his or her email inbox. The new Version 2.0 editions are a great demonstration of how the retail products of an Android app developer can benefit from custom app development projects and vice versa.

Frankly, it doesn’t take a lot of key strokes to email yourself a picture from your Android photo gallery. But if you are a novice user, that process is just one-more-thing-to-master. Or, if you are a busy retailer or seminar leader or real estate agent and you routinely need to send yourself pictures to document a problem or record a whiteboard or take note of an opportunity, any extra steps can turn should-be-easy into never-quite-got-it-done. Especially if you don’t always have connectivity and need to remember to do the mailing later when you get back in cell range.

The SnapTo apps all make taking one picture straight to your email inbox a two-click operation. And all but the free app make that work even if you don’t have connectivity when you take the picture.

The new versions of our three apps were inspired by contract Android app development we did this spring for CaptureBites, a Belgian company. Continue Reading →

Wyoming Team Earns First Place in Google GovDev Challenge

Our GovDev Challenge Prototype

Update:

Google’s own post about the challenge, with video, is now up on their Enterprise blog.

The GovDev Challenge

This past weekend, I had the fun and honor of participating in the first-ever Google GovDev Challenge. The 24-hour coding competition was created to explore ways modern technology could be used to transform government’s interaction with its citizens. It was a blast. And, oh BTW, my team earned first place in one of the challenges!

The competition was co-sponsored by the states of Wyoming and Colorado, both of which have active partnerships with Google in many areas. In fact, the state of Wyoming was the first state to ever convert its whole IT infrastructure to Google Apps. The three challenges focused on state-specific issues. Two were posed by Colorado, seeking better ways to help citizens in the event of another disaster of the magnitude of last fall’s Boulder floods.

Wyoming posed a Budget Transparency challenge. The state wants to make state budgeting and spending data available to all citizens and, in fact, has existing web interfaces available that do just that. But the current interfaces generally share the problem that the data is available but not very consumable — that is, the resulting grid-of-rows is hard to understand and digest. Continue Reading →

How to Code Math in HTML / CSS

A Labor of Love

Seeing HTML was developed by some nerds at CERN, it’s kinda weird that there’s no obvious and simple way to make pretty math with it, right? In developing math learning games for our project Study Putty (“Where the Cool Kids Go to Scrape by on Tests”), I found myself face-to-face with this issue: just how does one code complex math in html?

Math in HTML--Test shot at Study Putty

First, a little background. For those who don’t know, HTML stands for “hat and taco markup language,” because of all the ‘<‘ and ‘>’ you need to use, being that they look like pointy hats or taco shells getting folded. Hence the technical name for this language.

While many fine publishers of Internet content opt to use images to represent expressions, it was my belief that with a little creative HTMLing/CSSing, I could do it in less time than if I had produced static images of the math formulas I needed. Plus, this way the formulas would be guaranteed to match the font and general styling of the page in which they would be displayed, even if that styling should subsequently change. But what about LaTeX, you say? MathJax? Man, ain’t nobody got time to learn that. I’m a web designer, not some nerd or something. Oh, wait. Wait. Yes, I am being informed being a web designer qualifies me.

And also that it is highly suspicious that I know to pronounce LaTeX like LAY-TECH. Continue Reading →

SnapToMail App by CaptureBites: Automated Image Forwarding for Android

Sheridan Programmers Guild recently collaborated with CaptureBites of Belgium to produce their SnapToMail app for Android, now a free download on Google Play Apps.

SnapToMail

SnapToMail App for AndroidThe core of CaptureBites’ SnapToMail, much like Sherprog’s own SnapTo product line, is the ability to take photos with a mobile device directly to an email address of your choice without using the device’s preloaded camera and email apps. It reduces the process to as few as two steps: 1) snap picture, 2) hit send.

This creates the opportunity for a streamlined, automated document flow for transport/shipping, warehouses, real estate, insurance claim adjustment, home inspection reporting, construction auditing, and crime scene investigation among other applications. SnapToMail can be a solution for any Android user who needs to email photos regularly, repeatedly, or in bulk.

This is how CaptureBites describes the app: Continue Reading →

Facebook for marketers and other humans

Late last year I signed up to get email updates from the Pew Research Center. I get an email a week from them with 4-5 quick summaries. I usually find at least one item to click on and learn more about. This week, it was Facebook, which I am continually trying to understand and use better.

Demonstrating that even the Pew folks are always trying to increase readership, the title of the piece includes a number, which is said to boost click-throughs substantially: 6 New Facts About Facebook 

It’s a quick read, so I encourage you to scan it yourself. A few of the ‘facts’ struck me to me as having implications for marketers:

  • The extent to which Facebook users prefer to see photos and videos instead of straight text updates. (Fact #2)
  • The increased network effect when using Facebook to reach younger people versus older people. At the bottom of Fact #3, there is a remarkable stat: “Younger users tend to have significantly larger friend networks than older users: 27% of 18-29 year old Facebook users have more than 500 friends in their network, while 72% of users age 65+ have 100 friends or fewer.”
  • How people prefer to like or comment-on someone else’s content versus updating their own status or, even, wanting feedback on the content they do post. Even in a Facebook world, the majority of us are still lurkers at heart. (Fact #5)

And, perhaps not useful, but certainly interesting, Fact #6: “Half of internet users who do not use Facebook themselves live with someone who does.”

Triple Play lives again through print on demand

Triple Play proof copy

The first proof copy of the Elizabeth Gunn’s re-issued Triple Play paperback arrived in the mail earlier this week.

As readers of this blog may have noticed before, I’m rather proud of my Mom-the-novelist, Elizabeth Gunn. To date she has not ‘broken out’ and become a big name the way other regional mystery authors, such as Tony Hillerman and Archer Mayer or Wyoming’s own CJ Box and Craig Johnson, have done. But she has had 13 novels, in two different mystery series, ‘traditionally published’ in the last 17 years. Her publishers have always been conservative with their print runs but we’re pretty sure they sold every copy of her books ever printed. And that’s are remarkably achievement by any standard.

Mom, with the help of my Dad, who did the technical heavy lifting, was also a pioneer of ebook self-publishing. Continue Reading →

Lean Startups Go Mainstream

economistLogoI’ve been talking to my colleagues, around town and around the state, about the Lean Startup movement for some time. I was delighted to see The Economist get on board this week with their Tech Startups: A Cambrian moment special section. Lean Startups, aka Agile startups, focus on using new technologies to build what customers need and will use, not just what techies think would be cool to have.

The technique has its limitations, but it aims to ground innovation in the real world. And for both self-funded startups and those looking for angel or venture-capital investors, the real world is a very, very important thing to consider.

My own summary of what’s important about this approach is a slight variation on what you’ll find in some of the books:

The product of a startup is a viable business model, not a technology or, even, a solution.

And, BTW, if you don’t already have a subscription to the Economist, you might want to buy a newstand copy of the January 18th edition or just check out some of the other articles online. It’s full of interesting and even downright alarming pieces about technology, the prospects for specific jobs/professions in the next 50 years, and the promises and perils for individual prosperity of our accelerating technology revolution.

Not every issue of the Economist is as good as this one but many are. And the special sections, especially the regular quarterly one on Technology, pretty much justify the price of a subscription for me.

Self publishing: a flawed but useful overview

Guy Kawasaki's new book on self publishing#APETheBook: Buy the ebook not the softcover. Pick your chapters. Enough value to justify the price but some silly stuff to ignore.

Last month I gave a short talk to the Arizona Mystery Writers group in Tucson, Arizona. The presentation was supposed to be an overview of ebook production for self-published authors. But I ended up broadening the topic to attempt an overview of the larger process of self publishing, that is, how to target, produce, sell, and promote your own book.

One of my main themes was that authors who self-publish embark on an adventure that is much more like being a software entrepreneur than it is like being a writer. Both the technology and the markets are changing out from under you. Every day is full of too many good-ideas-that-should-be-done-right-away. The technology entrepreneur’s life is a sea of hard choices and risky trade-offs.

I thought that was a fairly original, clever idea until, late in my preparations, I came across a reference to Guy Kawasaki’s new book, APE: Author, Publisher, Entrepreneur-How to Publish a Book. Kawasaki and his co-author Shawn Welch not only made the same connection I did, before I did, he wrote a whole book on the topic. How’s that for embarrassing and affirming at the same time?

I didn’t have a chance to read the book before my presentation, but I did toss a reference to it into my hand-out. And I placed an order for the print edition so it would be waiting for me when I got back from Tucson. When a master entrepreneur and author arrives somewhere before you do, the only thing to do is stand back, bow respectfully, listen and learn what you can.

I bought the print edition because I was pretty sure I’d want to share the book. And, indeed, I ended up ceding right-of-first-read to Bret, who was on the cusp of publishing his own book of short stories. But now I’ve read the book, thrown the book across the room a couple of times, re-read and digested some of the good parts, stomped across the hall to Bret’s office to rant more than once, and, finally, am ready to recommend it, with reservations. Continue Reading →