DOT Placards App and ERG: Quick Lookup Ebook Discontinued

DOT Placards App to Be Discontinued

With the release of the Emergency Response Guidebook 2016, the National Institutes of Health has released a free ERG 2016 app for Android and iOS. We have reviewed the new NIH app and found the app comprehensive, well-made, and fully featured.

With previous versions of the NIH app, based on the ERG 2012 content, we felt there were some presentation and search features that our app did better. But the new 2016 NIH app exceeds our own in both features and content. For example, the NIH app now includes the ability to map isolation distances from your current location using street or satellite views.

In light of this, DOT Placards and DOT Placards Plus will be discontinued and removed from Google Play around the end of 2016.

We greatly appreciate all our users and their support that has made DOT Placards our most popular app with over 50,000 installs. Thank you!

Please direct any inquiries to support@sherprog.com, however do note that regular support services for these products are also discontinued and you are encouraged to download the NIH app for up-to-date data.

We encourage you to contact us if you are interested in the technologies behind adapting complex publications such as the ERG into app and ebook forms.

The Print-on-Demand Cover vs the Ebook Cover

Publishing Print-on-Demand and Ebook Simultaneously

Lessons Learned for Book Cover Design

Cool in Tucson First Edition

The cover of the original Severn House edition (2008).

Mystery writer Elizabeth Gunn’s Cool in Tucson has been out of print for a few years, and we are in the galley proof stage of reissuing this first Sarah Burke mystery in both print and ebook formats.

We’ve been working with ebooks for several years now, but this marks the second time we’ve utilized print-on-demand services concurrently with producing an ebook. (The first was the similar relaunch of Elizabeth’s Jake Hines series with Triple Play.) Below are some lessons learned from the process regarding the print-on-demand cover and its relationship to the ebook cover. Continue Reading →

Triple Play lives again through print on demand

Triple Play proof copy

The first proof copy of the Elizabeth Gunn’s re-issued Triple Play paperback arrived in the mail earlier this week.

As readers of this blog may have noticed before, I’m rather proud of my Mom-the-novelist, Elizabeth Gunn. To date she has not ‘broken out’ and become a big name the way other regional mystery authors, such as Tony Hillerman and Archer Mayer or Wyoming’s own CJ Box and Craig Johnson, have done. But she has had 13 novels, in two different mystery series, ‘traditionally published’ in the last 17 years. Her publishers have always been conservative with their print runs but we’re pretty sure they sold every copy of her books ever printed. And that’s are remarkably achievement by any standard.

Mom, with the help of my Dad, who did the technical heavy lifting, was also a pioneer of ebook self-publishing. Continue Reading →

Self publishing: a flawed but useful overview

Guy Kawasaki's new book on self publishing#APETheBook: Buy the ebook not the softcover. Pick your chapters. Enough value to justify the price but some silly stuff to ignore.

Last month I gave a short talk to the Arizona Mystery Writers group in Tucson, Arizona. The presentation was supposed to be an overview of ebook production for self-published authors. But I ended up broadening the topic to attempt an overview of the larger process of self publishing, that is, how to target, produce, sell, and promote your own book.

One of my main themes was that authors who self-publish embark on an adventure that is much more like being a software entrepreneur than it is like being a writer. Both the technology and the markets are changing out from under you. Every day is full of too many good-ideas-that-should-be-done-right-away. The technology entrepreneur’s life is a sea of hard choices and risky trade-offs.

I thought that was a fairly original, clever idea until, late in my preparations, I came across a reference to Guy Kawasaki’s new book, APE: Author, Publisher, Entrepreneur-How to Publish a Book. Kawasaki and his co-author Shawn Welch not only made the same connection I did, before I did, he wrote a whole book on the topic. How’s that for embarrassing and affirming at the same time?

I didn’t have a chance to read the book before my presentation, but I did toss a reference to it into my hand-out. And I placed an order for the print edition so it would be waiting for me when I got back from Tucson. When a master entrepreneur and author arrives somewhere before you do, the only thing to do is stand back, bow respectfully, listen and learn what you can.

I bought the print edition because I was pretty sure I’d want to share the book. And, indeed, I ended up ceding right-of-first-read to Bret, who was on the cusp of publishing his own book of short stories. But now I’ve read the book, thrown the book across the room a couple of times, re-read and digested some of the good parts, stomped across the hall to Bret’s office to rant more than once, and, finally, am ready to recommend it, with reservations. Continue Reading →

Clean HTML from Word: a Hack

We’ve been exploring ebook production here at Sherprog, and it seems like the best way to produce a high-quality EPUB or MOBI ebook using consumer tools involves starting from HTML. I’ve written about the inadequacies of InDesign’s export to HTML and EPUB, which is a problem many small publishers undoubtedly face. But individuals who publish or self publish ebooks are probably working from Microsoft Word or another common word processor. Unfortunately, Word also tends to produce messy HTML via its native save-as HTML function. So how do you get clean HTML from Word? I would like to present a life hack.

The Problem

Not very clean HTML from Word

Classes and spans and styles oh MY

When you export HTML from Microsoft Word, what you tend to get is a class and a span with styling info for every paragraph. This is highly unnecessary, and frustrating if you are trying to control your text’s formatting for web or ebook publication. In order to clean up this HTML to any web developer’s reasonable standards, you would have to remove all these tiresome span tags and CSS declarations just so you could do the same work with a handful of human-designed CSS declarations for paragraph style. I have done this before, and manually. It took several hours to work through a novel-sized manuscript using search and replace to knock out these span tags one related group at a time in a text/code editor.

Necessity is the mother of hack.

That is when I noticed that I routinely pasted Microsoft Word content into WordPress and could hit publish and magically get a reasonable webpage every time. I went to a blog post and used my browser’s “view source” option to take a look at exactly what was happening and, bingo-automattico, there was beautiful, simple HTML with every paragraph in a nice <p> tag and not a lot else going on! Continue Reading →

Testing and Tweaking Your Ebook Using Calibre Conversion

In the previous post, we talked about choosing the right Calibre conversion settings for a general-purpose, reasonably-formatted ebook. In this continuation, I present a time-saving tip for using Calibre to reconvert your ebook during testing and tweaking. In programmer lingo, you might call it iterative testing. The publisher’s translation could be galley proofing, I guess.

Chapter Three: Reconverting Using Merge Book Records 

In which the protagonist saves time and frustration while device testing and tweaking his ebook, including how to use the Calibre merge function without screwing @*#( up. 

In my experience, when you first bring a book into Calibre to convert it, you should consider yourself squarely in the testing/tweaking phase and not in the publishing phase. You know that the moment you open your converted book you will find that typo that’s been there staring at you the whole time but which has somehow eluded your editorial eye until now. Or you will try the ebook on various devices and find it’s not working like you want. Whatever the case is, odds are you will have to change a few things and put it through Calibre conversion again–probably more than once.

You will quickly note that if you delete a book from your library and then re-import your source HTML/CSS, you will need to enter all of the metadata and settings over again. This can grow very aggravating if you have to re-convert your book more than a few times. By the fifteenth attempt, you may find yourself staring at the metadata fields glassy-eyed and wondering just what you named that book again. Continue Reading →

HTML to EPUB: Calibre Conversion Settings and How to Preserve Indents

Chapter One: HTML

In which the protagonist prepares an HTML document for Calibre conversion to EPUB format. Our story begins as the hero has completed the treacherous journey from InDesign, which is not designed to design ebooks at all, to clean, ebook-worthy HTML and CSS. And what a journey it has been, with action and romance and stylesheet declarations and dragons.

The first step to any good ebook is a clean, well-formatted source document. In my previous post, which was specifically about creating an EPUB from InDesign, I make the argument that the best way to generate an ebook is from HTML. This is because EPUB files are, at the core, HTML, and Kindle MOBI markup is supposedly not far removed from HTML either. This facilitates good, clean conversions, and when you do find formatting problems, they are easy to troubleshoot–if you know just a little HTML/CSS.

Here we will use Calibre to create an ebook from an HTML document and its resources. Calibre is a free tool and you can get it from http://calibre-ebook.com. Though Calibre was designed primarily for personal use, I think it is very handy for professional ebook creation when it is not being done in-bulk. (However, Calibre does offer command-line tools for automated conversions–but we’re not getting into that today.) Continue Reading →

InDesign EPUB Export Sucks (and How to Get Around It)

The Mystery of Ebooks

VertigoEbooks are still frequently a quandary to the small-to-mid-sized publisher. But with rising sales of ebooks and the popularity of mobile devices, there comes a time when you must look the ebook in the eye and face the future–or face the fad, at least. (I don’t know if ebooks as we know them will be around in ten years. I just know they’re around now so we better deal with them.) Anyway, realizing this, maybe you give in and poke the InDesign EPUB export button, just to see. InDesign chugs and spurts and gurtles a little bit and then spits out an ebook. You think, “Oh! How easy was that?” But then…the book is opened and the nightmare begins.

The nightmare is the slow-learned revelation that ebooks are not necessarily easy, despite the existence of tools that claim to be able to produce them from other file types at the push of a button. Only if your page layout is like that of a straightforward novel with no illustrations or special formatting is there a blessed chance in heck that any automated ebook export will produce a book that looks halfway good with no additional labor. This is especially true of many InDesign layouts, because you will have layers and graphic frames and fonts and style overrides up the wazoo. All this fancy formatting that is great for print will not translate. Here is why in a nutshell: Ebooks are basically HTML, and not advanced web2.0/webapp/skynet HTML, but stripped-down, carved in a stone slab as Cuneiform kind of HTML–no layers, limited positioning, tricky-to-non-existent font embedding…It’s barbarian by web design standards.

However, there is a solution to this, and that is to make it TAO. EPUB books don’t allow a full array of styling control, and so you must relinquish control. The solution to the issue is “Simplify, simplify, simplify.” Thoroughly simplify–or Thoreau-ly simplify, as in Henry David Thoreau-ly, since I believe that is his quote. In simplicity, your document will find the elegance of ebook beauty. Embrace white space, embrace the inability to layer or position, and embrace the fact that ereaders may or may not substitute their plain defaults for your special fonts. Most of all, you must embrace the concept of flowing text. You have almost no control over how any given page will look. Continue Reading →

An iBook achievement

Screen shot 2013-09-05 at 2.30.27 PMApple Inc has such a gift for making small incremental achievements seem like huge victories. Our latest victory? All three of our ERG editions (English, French, and Spanish) are now for sale in the iTunes iBook marketplace.  It’s really just a small huzzah but it feels like a big deal to me.

Frankly, each of the ebook marketplaces presents its own set of challenges to the small publisher or self-published author.

Apple makes everything hard. Or, at least, it sure seems that way as you get started.  Only part of the toolset you must use to create and administer your ebooks in the iTunes marketplace is browser based.  The other part has to be installed on a local machine and that machine has to run OsX. So you have to own and use a Mac in order to publish an iBook. Doesn’t that seem just a bit narrow minded and self-serving to you? It does to me.

Most folks also have some trouble with the very strict epub validation step that Apple puts each epub file through. We did. But I have to say that the work we did to clean up the three ERGs so they would pass validation — and there was rather a lot of — also made the books more readable. I try not to complain, even about Apple, when the result is an improved product for our mutual customers. Continue Reading →

Ebook production: chaos and opportunity

Chaotic_mixingAugust was a busy month both in and out of the office. In house, we published the French Kindle edition of the ERG 2012, GMU 2012 : Guide Facile, and we successfully shepherded the English iBook edition through Apple’s tedious review process. We also learned, surprise!, that it takes at least as long for a change in the product description to get through Apple’s review process as it does the for the actual book to be reviewed. No quick fixes with Apple, ever.

Out on the road, I had the opportunity to meet face-to-face with a few specialty publishers who are either currently publishing ebook editions or are evaluating that option. Along with the phone conversations I had earlier, I’ve now had a whirlwind tour of the current state-of-the-art for small publishing houses.

The good news, for readers, is that most publishers are either on-board the ebook train or making their reservations as we speak. They know their readers want ebook editions. They are finding ways to supply those editions.  And they aren’t letting marketplace or technical uncertainties hold them back.

The bad news, for publishers, is that there’s no consensus yet on a best practice for producing those ebooks.  Each publishing house has had to, essentially, put together a DIY ebook production process

In my notes from the last five specialty publishers I’ve talked with at any length, I count a total of six separate production strategies. One house has experimented with two different processes and isn’t particularly satisfied with either yet.  Another has a ‘single’ strategy but it involves separate, parallel processes for producing their Kindle and Google Play editions.

Continue Reading →